mstrkrftz:

Budapest - Nyugati pályaudvar by Sződi István

devidsketchbook:

CEMENT ECLIPSES @ CHIAPAS MEXICO

Artist Isaac Cordal (tumblr / facebook) - “With the simple act of miniaturization and thoughtful placement, Isaac Cordal magically expands the imagination of pedestrians finding his sculptures on the street. Cement Eclipses is a critical definition of our behavior as a social mass. The art work intends to catch the attention on our devalued relation with the nature through a critical look to the collateral effects of our evolution. With the master touch of a stage director, the figures are placed in locations that quickly open doors to other worlds. The scenes zoom in the routine tasks of the contemporary human being”.

(via devidsketchbook)

aurorae:

萌 (by rufeng0758)

bassman5911:

Space hunters - gun by jamajurabaev

(via sekigan)

ashthorp:

Another savage from the Lost Boy saga.

(via error888)

zeroing:

Michael Magin, Metropolis, 2014

(via konishiroku)

odditiesoflife:

The Twisted Trees of Slope Point, New Zealand

Slope Point is at the southernmost point of the South Island of New Zealand. The air streams loop the ocean, unobstructed for 2000 miles, until they reach Slope Point causing incredibly strong winds. In fact, the winds are so strong and persistent here that they perpetually warp and twist the trees into these crooked, wind-swept shapes. 

Slope Point is generally uninhabited, except for the herds of sheep that graze the land. There are no roads leading here, however backpackers regularly make the short 20-minute walk to see the fascinating tree formations that only Mother Nature could create. However there is no public access during the lambing season from September to November.

sources 1, 2, 3, 4

(via pazzyhead)

(via hresvelgr)

10bullets:

Cold ears by WouterPera

(via earthandanimals)

radivs:

'Gonna build a heaven' by Felicia Simion

(via tarsjusz)

tiny-creatures:

Boophis viridis by Armin Hofen on Flickr.

(via konishiroku)

jamesjeanart:

Knight. Ink on Paper and Digital Color, 8.25 x 11.5”, 2014.